Connect with us

Features

Ranking 2019’s new county jerseys

The comprehensive ranking of 2019’s new home county kits.

2019 has been the year of the plain jersey. Plain collars, clean colours, straightforward retro designs and even, in one particular county’s case, no sponsors. So that makes a ranking like this particularly hard because, after a while, they all start to look the same. But nonetheless, there are some lovely new jerseys on display this year. For the sake of the ranking, we’re going with new primary jerseys only – so no goalkeeper or alternative (sorry Dublin!) jerseys allowed, even though there are some superb ones out there.

1 Sligo

Why does it top our list? It’s different – something very, very few efforts this year can claim to be. Sligo’s hurlers are flying the flag proudly, seeking to secure the Division 3B title and earn promotion out of the basement division, while the county’s footballers languish in Division 3, having already been relegated for next season. All of this is irrelevant, of course, because both sides look sharp, unique and eye-catching regardless. Clearly, it’s the dominant white that makes the geansaí stand out, with the red trim a lovely detail. An excellent return effort from O’Neills, with Sligo having gone outside the box in recent years with the likes of Kukri producing their kit.

 

2 Tipperary

We should have probably have seen the trend coming a while back. Fashion is a cyclical process, after all. The upsurge in retro, plain designed jerseys was coming in bits and drabs for a while, but now the chief national producer has made it mainstream. Less is more is the mantra, and sometimes it works, other times, not so much. Here, we reckon it does. The sponsor logo is arguably veering on the large side, especially with that extra line of text, but the infamous colours have justice done to them and it encapsulates the blue and gold magnificently. Should be a hit.

3 Limerick

One of the most controversial entries. First jersey in, probably, 30 odd years with no sponsor? It’s a trend that is unlikely to catch on, as most counties don’t have the benefit of a backer with little interest in pushing their own brand through the senior hurling and football sides. It’s a grower – and looks well in the flesh. The tone of green is delightful, the design takes simple to new levels. It’s going to divide opinion, no question of that, but here at GAA Wrap HQ, we’re in favour.

4 Cavan

A sweet effort. The pattern design adds a flair, albeit on top of the trusty template that has seen widespread use. The sponsor logo weaves its way brilliantly into the mosaic-style layout.

5 Dublin

The classic Dublin blue makes for a fine kit for the capital. The darker navy colour works well and the dark sleeves stand out to make what is sure to be a very popular jersey.

6 Leitrim

Another simplistic design with a little bit of jaziness with the effect on the front. The sponsor is cool though, giving it a retro feel in a world of simple modern logos.

7 Roscommon

The strong yellow and blue effect at the hem, in conjunction with a sponsor logo that blends in really well, makes for a lovely jersey for the Rossies.

8 Cork

It’s nice, but it’s another jersey ruined by the unwelcome intrusion of a massive logo. Cork would’ve done wonders with a Limerick-style logo free kit, but that’s not going to happen in Rebel Country any time soon.

9 Derry

This jersey is clearly doing the county good as they earned promotion from the depths of Division 4.

10 Mayo

Basically the Leitrim jersey with a different colour scheme. We’d argue that it’s a downgrade from their previous effort, but you can be sure it’s selling like hot chicken rolls up in Castlebar.

11 Armagh

Not a whole pile to say about this one. The same default design as other counties, but in the unique Armagh orange colour. The big green logo is a bit overbearing.

12 Monaghan

A grand, completely and utterly unoffensive look. It’s a pity fans are having to fork over €70 for plain white jerseys.

13 Tyrone

See above. The ultra white plain look was fantastic last year when no one else had copped on to the new style of Paul Gavlin inspired retro simplicity. This year, it’s just a run of the mill look.

14 Wicklow

A nice plain jersey, with the same format of most of the others in this list. But that logo is far too large. Take away the yellow background and it wouldn’t be too bad.

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *